22 July 2014

Up-cycling Coffee Jars

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My name is Lucy and I collect jars.

Please say it's not just me?

They are not just any kind of jars though, oh no, they are old Douwe-Egberts coffee jars (I don't even drink coffee!). People save them for me because I am obsessed and recently I had to cut off my source because it was getting jar crazy! The thing with them is that they are such a perfect shape and can be used for so many things, not only that but they come in all sizes and the mini ones are so darn cute!

So far I have used these jars for:
:: a flower vase
:: a paint brush pot
:: a make up brush holder
:: a drinking glass
:: to mix water-colour
:: to grow a hyacinth (the small ones)
:: general stationary storage (pins, paper clips etc!)

Today I thought I would show you something I have done with the little ones of late because they just look pretty! A quick sub-note is that if you want to use these for flowers you need to sit something inside the jar to hold the water as the paint is water soluble.

You will need:
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:: Paint brush
:: Jars
:: Old household paint (I had a couple of samples left over)
:: Acrylic paint
:: Old pot to mix your paint
:: Kitchen roll

How to:
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1. Wash your jar/s with washing up liquid to breakdown any grease and leave to dry completely.
2. Mix your paint so it is ready to go. I needed to add a small amount of water to mine as you will need the consistency to be thick but runny enough so that when you tip the jar it covers the inside.
3. Tip paint into the jar and move around to cover the inside (see above picture). Another option is to simply cover the bottom third of the jar to leave a dipped effect.
4. Once totally covered you may need a paint brush to finish or neaten the lip of the jar.
5. If there is quite a bit of paint remaining inside the jar just tip it back into the pot you mixed it in.
6. Use your kitchen roll to clean the top and stop drips running down the edge.
7. Stand the jar on a flat surface to dry. This will take several hours, especially as the paint will gather on the very bottom in quite a thick layer. I left mine over night.
8. Apply a second coat, repeating the process until you are happy with how they look.

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There you have it - and it really is so simple. I think they look great just as they are so I am going to pop mine on display in my office, but you could do anything with yours!

If you make them why not tag me on Instagram or Twitter to show me how they turned out?
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6 comments

  1. These look fantastic - might have to give them a go myself!
    x

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    1. Thanks Eleanor! They are stupidly simple and I think they look quite effective in the right spot. I saw on Pinterest that someone had done something similar by tipping glue inside and then glitter. Being a bit of a magpie myself I think that may be something to try this Christmas :-)

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  2. Don't worry, you're not the only one.
    At least you make them look nice! I'm horrible, I just keep them as they are. Sometimes I'm even too lazy to get the sticky bits off. Not good.

    {Teffy's Perks} X

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    1. Don't get me started on the labels! They are bloody impossible! Soaking in hot water followed by nail varnish remover seems to do the trick for me though (but ruins your nail varnish obviously!). :-)
      PS: I love your blog - just had a read! x

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  3. These are beauts. I do amass jars at an alarming rate - shall I send them over and you can make me some? Worth a go...
    M x Life Outside London

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    Replies
    1. Have you seen 'The Hoarder Next Door' - I am the jar hoarder next door! Send sweets not jars...or jars full of sweets...now there's a thought!! x

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